NostraDANus Predicts the Future of Pay (3 yr hindsight edition)

Stickman 2013 3 5 10 yrAt the end of 2013, Dan Walter was asked to predict what compensation would look like over the next 10 years. The first year of his predictions, 2017, is happening right now. Amazingly the news about executive compensation today reflects his predictions from 3 years ago.

Regarding executive pay

“…more leverage will be put on internal metrics and external metrics” (rather than TSR).

Regarding broad-base pay

“…far more of the budget will be dedicated to strong performers. Weaker performers will, unfortunately, be left further and further behind.”

Dan also made predictions for 2019 and 2023. Take a look at the full post from 2013 to see the future.

Do you want to get ahead of the compensation trends? Are looking for better ways to be competitive in a tight job market filled with companies paying almost exactly the same way? Perhaps it’s time to contact Performensation and create an approach to compensation that is future-proof.

Dan is the President and CEO of Performensation, a total rewards consulting firm that is dedicated to aligning pay with corporate strategy and culture. For more than a decade Performensation has been helping companies be successful by beating their competition. Call us today to start planning your future.

 

Startup Equity: In Conclusion (Part 14 of a 14 part series)

Stickman Startup In ConclusionIt feels odd to be wrapping up this series on Startup Equity. I started the series almost six-months ago, and although I have written around 10,000 words, I still have nearly endless things that we can discuss.

My goal was to provide some insight into the variations, complexity, power and hurdles that come along with equity compensation focused specifically on startups and other private companies. The information available is often too unreliable, too high level and too inconsistent to be useful. I hope this series has given readers multiple different perspectives and can provide the start for better conversations, better plan designs, and more successful companies. I am going to follow through on the suggestions from readers and colleagues that I turn the series into an ebook. If you are interested in getting a copy of the ebook, please shoot me an email (dwalter@performensation.com).

  1. You should know that determining grant size can be a challenge and that traditional techniques used for cash compensation do not translate well to the more variable nature of equity compensation. Using more refined methods can create much better results. 1
  2. You should know that NO ONE agrees on the value of equity compensation. Not ever. But, that’s OK as long as each party communicates the reasoning for their valuation. 2
  3. I hope you a have better understanding of the concerns of Venture Capital firms and similar early investors. Also, that you can better explain your case for equity and how it can drive their goals as well as yours. 3
  4. You should have a better understanding of how to use equity as your currency. You must also be willing to embrace your equity uniqueness, and why you shouldn’t put too much focus on comparisons to other companies (especially publicly traded) 4
  5. You may be able to evaluate better when you can accomplish your equity compensation goals with only a synthetic instrument. Sometimes polyester can outperform silk. Knowing when and how is the key. 5
  6. You should have a better grasp of when it makes sense to give additional equity grants and when it may be a recipe for failure. Most importantly, you should be clear that other companies’, entrepreneurs’, or thought-leaders’ formulaic methods or proven processes are unlikely to work perfectly for your company.6
  7. You should be fully aware of the MOST COMMON MISTAKE startups make when using equity compensation. 7
  8. You should be confident that your employees don’t understand their equity compensation any better than politicians understand the Internet. 8
  9. You should know that the variables that have the most impact at startups are Vesting, Termination Rules and Change in Control provisions. If you get these right for your goals and timeline, you are more than halfway to success. 9
  10. Performance-based equity shouldn’t be that scary to you. Yes, there is more to it than time-based equity, but it can be far more effective at getting you to your destination. 10
  11. Staying private and using equity compensation in a world obsessed with IPOs should no longer seem crazy. Equity compensation is very a useful tool and can even offer significant design advantages if you are willing to explore the possibilities. 11
  12. Hopefully, you know more about the evolution of cash pay and equity compensation levels over the past decade or two. Equity may no longer give you the savings that it once did, but that can offset by its long-term competitiveness. 12
  13. You may better understand more technical issues like Rights of First Refusal, Tag Along Rights and Drag Along Rights. Not everyone goes public, and not everyone stays at your company forever. Proper planning and documentation can lead to less stress and angst. 13

You will notice that I have touched on some of the more commonly covered topics like accounting and taxation issues. I have barely talked about things like ISOs and NonQuals. And, I haven’t gotten into the final 12-18 months in the run-up to IPO. There are at least one hundred other topics that tend to only come up in very specific conversations, but I think the foundation has been laid and hope that you will share any other specific topics that you may want me to cover in the future. Thanks, and I hope you will come back and read my future articles whether or not they cover startup issues.

Startup Equity: But Can’t I Pay Less Cash? (Part 12 in an n part series)

Stickman Startup Cash ValueThis series of articles has covered a lot of ground, but this particular article touches on a critical component that we have not really discussed. When equity first began to be used in Silicon Valley, prior to the boom of the late-1980’s, the goal was getting senior players to have some skin in the game. This is still a major objective of equity.

As the stock market took off in the late 1980’s and flew through the 1990’s, equity became a cheap replacement for cash. The accounting rules ensured equity barely touched companies’ books. The stock market ensured that equity delivered far more, far faster that any form cash compensation. These high growth companies were able to keep cash pay low. This allowed the to easily compete for talent against large mature companies. This is no longer the case.

Many things have changed since the 1990’s. When it comes to equity compensation, the biggest change is that you only see lower cash pay at the earliest of startups. Far more Angel and Venture Capital money is being spent on staff than in the past. This means that less is going to research and development, or larger investments are required to build companies with no better potential than those in the past.

Remember that the accepted “value” of startups is based on recent investment rounds. Very few consider that a far great percentage of these investment rounds is being spent on staff than ever before. In fact, below the very top roles, we see very little differentiation in pay between public and private companies. The startup discount no longer exists for most industries.

What does this mean if you are an executive, HR leader of compensation professional? First, you need to budget the essentially the same base pay, and perhaps cash short-term incentives regardless of whether you have just finished your B-Round or your IPO. Second it means you need to be far better at using equity intelligently and efficiently. You can no longer throw a basic equity plan out there and expect to also get away with sub-par salaries.

Add to all of this the rapidly changing workplace and experience. Companies are spreading out more quickly. Employees at all levels are looking for more workplace (and time) flexibility. Housing prices are skyrocketing in nearly every location where equity compensation is a strong component of total rewards. The fundamental equation has changed and companies, and their leaders, must learn and adapt. They must understand that the bargain garage-based startup is far different when a garage now costs $1 Million.

So, in answer to the question: “How much less can I may my employees if I also give them reasonable equity?” If you are a typical startup, equity will not give you any direct cash savings. Of course, if you are in any industry where equity is uncommon it may still have some capability to reduce cash pay, but those industries are becoming increasingly rare.

The next pieces of this series will touch upon some of the most technical equity issues that are often not included in terms of compensation. These include: Call and Put Rights, Drag Along and Tag Along Rights and Rights of First Refusal. Let me know what else interests you in the space as I am wrapping up this series in the not so distant future.

Startup Equity: Three Crucial Variables (Part 9 of an n part series)

stickman startup three crucial thingsStartup equity has approximately a gazillion moving parts. But three of these variables are far more important than all of the others. These three components are what make your plan uniquely yours. They are the things that require real thought. They are also the elements that are most commonly viewed as “plug-and-play” in the world of startups.

  1. Vesting Schedule

Stock options are grants with four-year vesting schedules. Everyone knows this. RSUs have a three-year schedule. Everyone knows this as well. However, while these are the most common vesting schedules, they are not as “standard” or as scientific as you may think.

The truth about vesting is a bit more complex. Vesting should align with Continue reading

Startup Equity: The Most Common Mistake (Part 7 of an n part series)

untitledHere is my 2017 gift to you. I truly believe that equity compensation helped build the technology industry, and therefore the world as we know it. But, an unfortunate number of startups make the same error when using this complex and powerful tool that drive corporate success.

If you browse the internet, ask entrepreneurs or receive guidance from someone at a VC firm, you will get similar answers when asking about equity awards for the first twenty, or so, employees. This information, while accurate at a generic level, is likely to be incorrect for your specific circumstances.

The answer looks a bit like this. Outside of the founders, the C-level hires should each get Continue reading

Startup Equity: Isn’t It Refreshing? (maybe not) – (Part 6 of an n part series)

untitledThe historically long periods between the startup and “big event” for companies has given rise to many issues that were never considered when stock options and other equity tools first became the preferred startup incentive tool. Among these unplanned issues are things like:

  • Wealth inequality between the first 20 employees and employee 5,000 or 12,000 or more
  • Grants expire when the company has not yet made its move to IPO
  • 409A Valuations
  • Dilution and burn rate issues long before IPO
  • Grants becoming stale
  • Downward movement in stock prices
  • (Ugh, this list can take the maximum 800 words allowed for this post)

This post we will discuss the controversial issue of “refreshing” grants for long-term employees. To clarify, these are not grants for promotions or company-wide performance. These are equity compensation awards that are given simply because Continue reading

%-#-$ – Startup Equity: It’s Enough to Make You Swear!

untitled7Figuring out the right amount of equity compensation at startups is a challenge. How much should I grant? How big should the grant be? How should I size the grant relative to base pay? Investors, boards, executives, HR and compensation departments at start-ups have conflicts over these questions all the time. In the past I have written about the 11 Reasons Your Equity Compensation Survey Data is Wrong. This article focuses on three common ways to determine equity at startups regardless of your survey source.

% Percentage of FD Outstanding Shares

This is where most companies start. The first 10 or 20 key players at a start-up are Continue reading

Broadway Acts on Sharing Success

untitled12You build it. You buy it. This may become the new mantra on Broadway. The original cast of Hamilton was recently followed by the new cast of Disney’s Frozen in receiving a share of the success of the shows they helped create. Similar to a great tech company building towards an IPO, a Broadway company has to do a whole lot of work before it ever gets to the starting line. Beyond the original idea, words and songs are the testing, tweaks, enhancements and embellishments that can make or break a show.

For years the formula worked like this. Continue reading

Applying Pixar’s “22 Rules of Storytelling” to Pay

untitledWhat do ‘Up’, ‘Cars’, ‘Inside Out’, ‘Monsters, Inc’, ‘Ratatouille’, ‘Toy Story 3’, ‘The Incredibles’, ‘Finding Nemo’, ‘Toy Story’ and ‘WALL-E’ have in common? First, they are 10 of the best animated movies made by Pixar. Second, they all follow Pixar’s “22 Rules of Storytelling.” As it turns out, these rules adapt well to the world of compensation plans and philosophy. Continue reading

Are Your Pay Plans Just New Hire “Click Bait”?

untitled5“You won’t believe what this star from the ‘80’s look like now!” “The best banana bread EVER!” “This great trend is your next haircut!”

It happens to everyone. We see the headline and click through to see the interesting pictures or stories. When the new page opens up (and we get past the explosion of ads) we find nothing surprising, new or even interesting. In fact, we are disappointed and annoyed that we were fooled again. Before you stop reading, you should know that this is exactly what many of our compensation programs are doing during the recruitment process.

Attract, Motivate, Retain (and hopefully Engage). This is the mantra of Continue reading