NostraDANus Predicts the Future of Pay (3 yr hindsight edition)

Stickman 2013 3 5 10 yrAt the end of 2013, Dan Walter was asked to predict what compensation would look like over the next 10 years. The first year of his predictions, 2017, is happening right now. Amazingly the news about executive compensation today reflects his predictions from 3 years ago.

Regarding executive pay

“…more leverage will be put on internal metrics and external metrics” (rather than TSR).

Regarding broad-base pay

“…far more of the budget will be dedicated to strong performers. Weaker performers will, unfortunately, be left further and further behind.”

Dan also made predictions for 2019 and 2023. Take a look at the full post from 2013 to see the future.

Do you want to get ahead of the compensation trends? Are looking for better ways to be competitive in a tight job market filled with companies paying almost exactly the same way? Perhaps it’s time to contact Performensation and create an approach to compensation that is future-proof.

Dan is the President and CEO of Performensation, a total rewards consulting firm that is dedicated to aligning pay with corporate strategy and culture. For more than a decade Performensation has been helping companies be successful by beating their competition. Call us today to start planning your future.

 

Startup Equity: The Most Common Mistake (Part 7 of an n part series)

untitledHere is my 2017 gift to you. I truly believe that equity compensation helped build the technology industry, and therefore the world as we know it. But, an unfortunate number of startups make the same error when using this complex and powerful tool that drive corporate success.

If you browse the internet, ask entrepreneurs or receive guidance from someone at a VC firm, you will get similar answers when asking about equity awards for the first twenty, or so, employees. This information, while accurate at a generic level, is likely to be incorrect for your specific circumstances.

The answer looks a bit like this. Outside of the founders, the C-level hires should each get Continue reading

Startup Equity: Isn’t It Refreshing? (maybe not) – (Part 6 of an n part series)

untitledThe historically long periods between the startup and “big event” for companies has given rise to many issues that were never considered when stock options and other equity tools first became the preferred startup incentive tool. Among these unplanned issues are things like:

  • Wealth inequality between the first 20 employees and employee 5,000 or 12,000 or more
  • Grants expire when the company has not yet made its move to IPO
  • 409A Valuations
  • Dilution and burn rate issues long before IPO
  • Grants becoming stale
  • Downward movement in stock prices
  • (Ugh, this list can take the maximum 800 words allowed for this post)

This post we will discuss the controversial issue of “refreshing” grants for long-term employees. To clarify, these are not grants for promotions or company-wide performance. These are equity compensation awards that are given simply because Continue reading

Startup Equity: Synthetic Equity or Sharing Without Sharing (Part 5 of an n part series)

untitled4When you hear “equity compensation” and startups, you immediately think of stock options. More recently RSUs (restricted stock units that settle in company stock) have also been popular. But, what if you aren’t the “sharing” type? Or what if your company doesn’t have stock? LLCs are a good example. How does your business compete when it doesn’t have access to the same tools? Synthetic equity is becoming an increasingly popular answer.

Synthetic equity refers to any type of incentive plan where the value delivered to participants fluctuates based on the value of the enterprise. For corporations, the most common tools are Continue reading

Startup Equity: Comparing Your “Currency” to a Competitor’s (Part 4 of an n part series)

untitledComparing base bay is relatively easy, equity not so much. A dollar is a dollar. And, if a dollar isn’t a dollar (let’s say it’s a Franc), there are published exchange rates to help convert values. But, with equity compensation, the base currency is your stock, and its value is not easily translated (or even agreed upon). This fundamental disconnect is one of the most challenging issues faced by anyone dealing with equity compensation at a start-up.

Let’s start with the oversimplified example above. There are exchange rates from dollars to francs, but they are not as consistent as the prices available for Continue reading

Startup Equity: Why are VCs Getting so Stingy with Equity? (Part 3 of an n part series)

6a0134836082f8970c01b7c8b0ac08970b-200wiDoes this familiar?

You had a great idea and turned it into a company. Somehow you got to the point where Venture Capitalists were willing to invest. You may have had less than 50 employees and less than 15% of the company committed to non-founder employees. You grew and kept innovating. Equity compensation was the currency of the day and the hope of tomorrow. Your value grew and more investors came on board. Then the equity spigot became a trickle.

What’s up?

Many VC returns have shrunk in 2016. When VCs see their value melting, they react exactly as you might expect. They become more Continue reading

OMG! You Were Right All Along!

untitled11Remember that time you spent weeks modeling a new incentive plan only to have it shot down? They explained that any goals needed to be based on RESULTS! You maintained that the reason interim goals were included, was to ensure that success could be achieved and communicated throughout the process.

Remember that other time you explained to your managers that they needed to have frequent conversations on the new pay for performance program? And, when it didn’t work they told you Continue reading

The Real Cost of Mismanaged Incentives: Wells Fargo

untitledWell, so much for the warm-hearted caffeinated, pick-me-up from the Comp Café. Today is a steaming jolt of quadruple espresso in response to the Wells Fargo incentive pay mess. Let me start with the fact that I have been interviewed a few times about this story and even I was surprised by my response to the question, “What companies in the financial world are considered to have good incentive programs?” I answered that if I had been asked a few weeks ago, Wells Fargo would have been on the list. I guess it’s hard to know what you don’t know.

If you have been under a log for a couple of weeks, please start by reading a couple of earlier Compensation Café Articles (my own When Incentive Pay Goes Rogue! and Jim Brennan’s Excessively Successful Incentives). That foundation will help you understand the following summary.

A couple weeks ago, Wells Fargo was fined about $185 million for fraudulently opening millions of accounts. They also fired 5,300 employees and were the media poster-child for why incentive plans are terrible. At the very least, the plans in question ended up costing more than they delivered. In the past few days, the real costs of these programs are starting to reveal themselves. Recent developments are listed below. Continue reading

Why Should Employees Care About Investors?

untitled3Apple’s stock price is somewhere around $108 today. Over the past five years it has been anywhere from $50 to $132. Medpace was the most recent Initial Public Offering (IPO) on NASDAQ. Thursday, August 11, 2016 their IPO price was $23. By Friday, August 12, the price was above $28 by close of the market. Both of these are great stories, but why should their employees care?

Many people have the misconception that the company gets some piece of the price paid for the stock on the public market. This isn’t true, even at the time of an IPO. At an IPO, the company sets a price to begin initial trading. They get that price for a block of shares sold in the offering. Once the stock has been sold, any gain or loss goes to or from the investors, not the company. This remains true for every one of those shares that remains outstanding after the IPO.

So, in the case of Apple, the price of the stock does Continue reading

A Small Problem for Compensation Professionals

6a0134836082f8970c01bb090d7e4a970d-200wiThis is not the article I intended to post today. I had something else ready to go, but realized this was more important. I am sitting in my hotel room in San Diego, California getting ready to head over for the second day of the annual WorldatWork Total Rewards Conference. Total Rewards is a BIG category.  In three days it is not possible to dive into every type and flavor of “reward”. But one important family of compensation, equity, is almost completely missing from this year’s event.

Don’t get me wrong. There are some Continue reading