Startup Equity: In Conclusion (Part 14 of a 14 part series)

Stickman Startup In ConclusionIt feels odd to be wrapping up this series on Startup Equity. I started the series almost six-months ago, and although I have written around 10,000 words, I still have nearly endless things that we can discuss.

My goal was to provide some insight into the variations, complexity, power and hurdles that come along with equity compensation focused specifically on startups and other private companies. The information available is often too unreliable, too high level and too inconsistent to be useful. I hope this series has given readers multiple different perspectives and can provide the start for better conversations, better plan designs, and more successful companies. I am going to follow through on the suggestions from readers and colleagues that I turn the series into an ebook. If you are interested in getting a copy of the ebook, please shoot me an email (dwalter@performensation.com).

  1. You should know that determining grant size can be a challenge and that traditional techniques used for cash compensation do not translate well to the more variable nature of equity compensation. Using more refined methods can create much better results. 1
  2. You should know that NO ONE agrees on the value of equity compensation. Not ever. But, that’s OK as long as each party communicates the reasoning for their valuation. 2
  3. I hope you a have better understanding of the concerns of Venture Capital firms and similar early investors. Also, that you can better explain your case for equity and how it can drive their goals as well as yours. 3
  4. You should have a better understanding of how to use equity as your currency. You must also be willing to embrace your equity uniqueness, and why you shouldn’t put too much focus on comparisons to other companies (especially publicly traded) 4
  5. You may be able to evaluate better when you can accomplish your equity compensation goals with only a synthetic instrument. Sometimes polyester can outperform silk. Knowing when and how is the key. 5
  6. You should have a better grasp of when it makes sense to give additional equity grants and when it may be a recipe for failure. Most importantly, you should be clear that other companies’, entrepreneurs’, or thought-leaders’ formulaic methods or proven processes are unlikely to work perfectly for your company.6
  7. You should be fully aware of the MOST COMMON MISTAKE startups make when using equity compensation. 7
  8. You should be confident that your employees don’t understand their equity compensation any better than politicians understand the Internet. 8
  9. You should know that the variables that have the most impact at startups are Vesting, Termination Rules and Change in Control provisions. If you get these right for your goals and timeline, you are more than halfway to success. 9
  10. Performance-based equity shouldn’t be that scary to you. Yes, there is more to it than time-based equity, but it can be far more effective at getting you to your destination. 10
  11. Staying private and using equity compensation in a world obsessed with IPOs should no longer seem crazy. Equity compensation is very a useful tool and can even offer significant design advantages if you are willing to explore the possibilities. 11
  12. Hopefully, you know more about the evolution of cash pay and equity compensation levels over the past decade or two. Equity may no longer give you the savings that it once did, but that can offset by its long-term competitiveness. 12
  13. You may better understand more technical issues like Rights of First Refusal, Tag Along Rights and Drag Along Rights. Not everyone goes public, and not everyone stays at your company forever. Proper planning and documentation can lead to less stress and angst. 13

You will notice that I have touched on some of the more commonly covered topics like accounting and taxation issues. I have barely talked about things like ISOs and NonQuals. And, I haven’t gotten into the final 12-18 months in the run-up to IPO. There are at least one hundred other topics that tend to only come up in very specific conversations, but I think the foundation has been laid and hope that you will share any other specific topics that you may want me to cover in the future. Thanks, and I hope you will come back and read my future articles whether or not they cover startup issues.