Compounding Our Pay Problems

untitled 2The pay ratios between CEOs and average employees are once again in the news. This is partly because proxy season always raises this issue and partly because there is a move in some circles to do away with the new pay ratio disclose rule that is part of Dodd-Frank. This year’s ratios will likely be bigger than last. The same will likely be true for most years in the foreseeable future. Here’s why.

The average annual increase for the average employee has been between 2.6% and 3.2% for several years. The use of equity compensation and other long-term compensation tools went down over at least the past decade. At the same time, executive base pay has increased between 5% and 8% most years over most of the past decade. During this period, the use of Continue reading

Let’s All Do Nothing About Pay

untitledAre we really doing anything? We create salary structures and write job descriptions. We organization our data and provide reports up and down the organization. We do a lot, but how much of it is making us competitive in a tight talent market?

The “annual Increase.” Sometimes we even call it a merit increase. According to one study, at the beginning of 2016 companies predicted their pay budgets would increase 3% and at the end of the year they reported the actual increase was 2.6%. Similar reports from several prior years had Continue reading

Startup Equity: Staying Private in a Public World (Part 11 in an n part series)

Stickman Startup Private CoIt is readily accepted that an IPO is Nirvana to a startup. Of course, a fantabulous acquisition will also work in a pinch. Most startups design their equity plans around one or both of these possibilities. The events increasingly trigger vesting events, earn-out periods, house purchases and early retirements. But, what if you want to build something far longer-term? What if you only want to grow, make money and accomplish some important goal? Do equity plans even work for these companies?

The short answer is, they Continue reading

Startup Equity: What About Performance? (Part 10 of an n part series)

Stickman Startup Performance Dashboard“But, how do I make sure that the person is a great performer before I am forced to give them equity?”

This question gets asked by nearly every Founder, Investor or Compensation Committee Member very early in the development of an equity compensation plan. Sometimes it is expressed more genuinely as, “I don’t want to give away part of my company to someone who hasn’t carried their fair share.” Either way, the concern is valid. Sometimes the answer is very simple, and sometimes it is not.

Your equity compensation plan should be aligned with Continue reading

Startup Equity: Comparing Your “Currency” to a Competitor’s (Part 4 of an n part series)

untitledComparing base bay is relatively easy, equity not so much. A dollar is a dollar. And, if a dollar isn’t a dollar (let’s say it’s a Franc), there are published exchange rates to help convert values. But, with equity compensation, the base currency is your stock, and its value is not easily translated (or even agreed upon). This fundamental disconnect is one of the most challenging issues faced by anyone dealing with equity compensation at a start-up.

Let’s start with the oversimplified example above. There are exchange rates from dollars to francs, but they are not as consistent as the prices available for Continue reading

Startup Equity: Why are VCs Getting so Stingy with Equity? (Part 3 of an n part series)

6a0134836082f8970c01b7c8b0ac08970b-200wiDoes this familiar?

You had a great idea and turned it into a company. Somehow you got to the point where Venture Capitalists were willing to invest. You may have had less than 50 employees and less than 15% of the company committed to non-founder employees. You grew and kept innovating. Equity compensation was the currency of the day and the hope of tomorrow. Your value grew and more investors came on board. Then the equity spigot became a trickle.

What’s up?

Many VC returns have shrunk in 2016. When VCs see their value melting, they react exactly as you might expect. They become more Continue reading

Startup Equity: 409A vs Investor Value (part 2 of an n part series)

untitledfWe have all seen the headlines, “XYZ receives $100M in funding at a $3B valuation.” We seldom see the “other” valuation showing the same company is worth $350M. For publicly-traded companies, value is determined by investors working as a group in a real-time market. They are generally purchasing the same kind of stock. Values are based on a combination of publicly disclosed information, supercool computer models and gut feel. But in the world of the pre-IPO start-ups, values take on a life of their own.

Investors in startups are buying stock with more risk and more upside potential. Companies only sell stock to investors on Continue reading

Broadway Acts on Sharing Success

untitled12You build it. You buy it. This may become the new mantra on Broadway. The original cast of Hamilton was recently followed by the new cast of Disney’s Frozen in receiving a share of the success of the shows they helped create. Similar to a great tech company building towards an IPO, a Broadway company has to do a whole lot of work before it ever gets to the starting line. Beyond the original idea, words and songs are the testing, tweaks, enhancements and embellishments that can make or break a show.

For years the formula worked like this. Continue reading

Applying Pixar’s “22 Rules of Storytelling” to Pay

untitledWhat do ‘Up’, ‘Cars’, ‘Inside Out’, ‘Monsters, Inc’, ‘Ratatouille’, ‘Toy Story 3’, ‘The Incredibles’, ‘Finding Nemo’, ‘Toy Story’ and ‘WALL-E’ have in common? First, they are 10 of the best animated movies made by Pixar. Second, they all follow Pixar’s “22 Rules of Storytelling.” As it turns out, these rules adapt well to the world of compensation plans and philosophy. Continue reading

Are Your Pay Plans Just New Hire “Click Bait”?

untitled5“You won’t believe what this star from the ‘80’s look like now!” “The best banana bread EVER!” “This great trend is your next haircut!”

It happens to everyone. We see the headline and click through to see the interesting pictures or stories. When the new page opens up (and we get past the explosion of ads) we find nothing surprising, new or even interesting. In fact, we are disappointed and annoyed that we were fooled again. Before you stop reading, you should know that this is exactly what many of our compensation programs are doing during the recruitment process.

Attract, Motivate, Retain (and hopefully Engage). This is the mantra of Continue reading